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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Resource abundance and economic development found in the catalog.

Resource abundance and economic development

Resource abundance and economic development

  • 167 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Natural resources,
  • Sustainable development,
  • Economic development

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by R.M. Auty
    ContributionsAuty, R. M., World Institute for Development Economics Research
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHC85 .R47 2001
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 340 p. :
    Number of Pages340
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17024248M
    ISBN 100199246882
    LC Control Number2001021138


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Resource abundance and economic development Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book explores the factors behind the underperformance of resource-abundant developing countries compared to resource-deficient countries. Drawing on research from various subfields within economics literature, it argues that since the s, the natural resource endowment of a developing country has strongly affected its capital utilisation efficiency and the nature of its long-term development trajectory.

Resource Abundance and Economic Development (WIDER Studies in Development Economics) [Auty, Richard M.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Resource Abundance and Economic Development (WIDER Studies in Development Economics)Format: Paperback.

Buy Resource Abundance and Economic Development (): NHBS - Edited By: RM Auty, Oxford University Press. Malaysia, a rare example of successful resource-abundant development, is contrasted with Ghana, Bolivia, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and Argentina, which all experienced a growth collapse.

The book also explores policies for reviving collapsed economies with reference to Costa Rica, South Africa, Russia and Central Asia. Malaysia, a rare example of successful resource-abundant development, is contrasted with Ghana, Bolivia, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and Argentina, which all experienced a growth collapse.

The book also explores policies for reviving collapsed economies with reference to Costa Rica, South Africa, Russia and Central Asia. Since the s the economies of the resource-poor nations have grown much faster than those of the resource-abundant nations.

This book explains the disappointing performance of resource-abundant nations by extending the growth accounting framework to include natural and social capital.

Resource Abundance and Economic Development Edited by R. Auty WIDER Studies in Development Economics. Provides a comprehensive explanation of the 'resource curse' Develops two basic models to explain the divergent development trajectories of resource-poor and resource-rich developing countries.

Yet the mineral-driven resource-rich economies have high growth potential because the mineral exports boost their capacity to invest and to import."Resource Abundance and Economic Development" explains the disappointing performance of resource-abundant countries by extending the growth accounting framework to include natural and social capital.

Request PDF | Resource Abundance and Economic Development | This book explores the factors behind the underperformance of resource-abundant developing countries compared to resource-deficient.

Resource poor Large 7 Small 13 Resource rich Large 10 Small PER CAPITA INCOME AND ECONOMIC GROWTH, SYRQUIN/CHENERY AGGREGATES Growth PC GDP Net investment ICOR Pop. PC GDP Value added Labour prod. Years. One of the surprising features of modern economic growth is that economies with abundant natural resources have tended to grow less rapidly than natural-resource-scarce economies.

In this paper we show that economies with a high ratio of natural resource exports to GDP in (the base year) tended to have low growth rates during the subsequent period Cited by: Resource abundance and economic development [electronic resource] / edited by R.M.

Auty. Corporate Author: Ebook Central Academic Complete., World Institute for Development Economics Research., ProQuest (Firm) Other authors: Auty, R. Format: eBook Online access: Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central. Economic & Social Affairs DESA Working Paper No.

93 ST/ESA//DWP/93 June Resource abundance: A Resource abundance and economic development book or blessing. Victor Polterovich, Vladimir Popov, and Alexander Tonis. 'Barbier's book will bring to the forefront the oft-neglected role of natural resources in the development process.

The range of this book is remarkable, weaving together as it does both solid economic theory and abundant analysis of what is actually going on in the developing world today, while also providing a fascinating tour of resources through economic history as well as thoughtful Author: Edward B.

Barbier. Fig. 1 shows a scatterplot of per capita economic growth from to and natural resource abundance as measured by the share of natural capital in national wealth (i.e., the share of natural capital in total capital, which comprises physical, human, and natural capital; 2 see World Bank, ).The 86 countries in the figure are represented by one dot each.

3 The regression line through Cited by: Resource Abundance and Economic Development by R. Auty,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

"Resource Abundance and Economic Development" explains the disappointing performance of resource-abundant countries by extending the growth accounting framework to include natural and social capital.

The resulting synthesis identifies two contrasting development trajectories: the competitive industrialization of the resource-poor countries and the staple trap of many resource-abundant.

Fig. 2 depicts the negative correlation between resource abundance and economic growth over the period – for the 49 states for which data were available for all the variables of our analysis (all US states excluding the District of Columbia and Delaware).

The correlation is significant at the 1% level. Data are compiled from the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the US Ministry of by: First, abundance of natural resources is closely associated with levels of economic development.

Second, we emphasize that an abundance of natural resources is not a fixed situation. In this paper I would like to address the issue of natural resource abundance as a factor in economic development. The issue is of topical interest to policymakers as well as academics today, as the recent growth acceleration of many an African economy is thought to be driven by the on-going booms in primary Size: KB.

"Resource Abundance and Economic Development" explains the disappointing performance of resource-abundant countries by extending the growth accounting framework to include natural and social capital. The resulting synthesis identifies two contrasting development trajectories: the competitive industrialization of the resource-poor countries and.

Yet the mineral-driven resource-rich economies have high growth potential because the mineral exports boost their capacity to invest and to import. "Resource Abundance and Economic Development" explains the disappointing performance of resource-abundant countries by extending the growth accounting framework to include natural and social : Taschenbuch.

Downloadable. One of the surprising features of modern economic growth is that economies with abundant natural resources have tended to grow less rapidly than natural-resource-scarce economies.

In this paper we show that economies with a high ratio of natural resource exports to GDP in (the base year) tended to have low growth rates during the subsequent period Resource Abundance and Economic Development.

Edited by R. Auty. in OUP Catalogue from Oxford University Press. Abstract: Since the s the per capita incomes of the resource-poor countries have grown significantly faster than those of the resource-abundant countries.

In fact, in recent years economic growth has been inversely proportional to the share of natural resource rents in GDP, so Cited by: Book Description. The relationship between natural capital and economic growth is an open debate in the field of economic development.

Is an abundance of natural resources a blessing or a curse for economic performance. Your third book is The Theory of Economic Growth by W Arthur Lewis.

He was the first Nobel Prize-winner in the subject of development economics. He was also very much rooted in classical economics of the political-economy tradition as well as the classical economist’s concern with structural transformation of a developing economy. The negative association between resource abundance and growth in recent decades certainly poses a conceptual puzzle.

After all, natural resources increase wealth and purchasing power over imports, so that resource abundance might be expected to raise an economy's investment and growth rates as well. Buy Resource Abundance and Economic Development Books online at best prices in India by Richard Auty, World Institute for Development Economic,R M Auty from Buy Resource Abundance and Economic Development online of India’s Largest Online Book Store, Only Genuine Products.

Lowest price and Replacement Guarantee. Cash On Delivery Available. Since the s the resource-poor countries have grown much faster that the resource-rich ones. This reflects basic differences in the speed of industrialization and the nature of the political state that are rooted in the natural resource endowment.

Most resource-rich countries experienced a growth collapse in the s and s. This book shows how policies for economic recovery must be. AbstractThis study explores the links between education, resource incomes, and wealth distribution, using a 2-period household model and data from an Indian fishery.

The model predicts an ambiguous and wealth-dependent impact of increasing resource incomes on education. The empirical approach uses geographical variations in exogenously increasing fish catches to show that higher fish catches Author: Frederik Noack.

Mineral Wealth and Economic Development John M. Olin distinguished lectures in mineral economics RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE: Editor: John E. Tilton: Publisher: Resources for the Future, ISBN:Length: pages: Subjects. Auty, R. & World Institute for Development Economics Research.

Resource abundance and economic development: improving the performance of resource-rich countries / Richard M. Auty UNU World Institute for Development Economics Research Helsinki, Finland. Wikipedia Citation. A Growth Collapse with High Rent Point Resources: Saudi Arabia A Growth Collapse with High Rent Point Resources: Saudi Arabia Chapter: (p) 12 A Growth Collapse with High Rent Point Resources: Saudi Arabia Source: Resource Abundance and Economic Development Author(s): Richard M.

Auty (Contributor Webpage) Publisher: Oxford University Press. natural resource abundance was beneficial for economic devel- opment of a region. In s most of the economists and geog- raphers were of the opinion that a significant endowment of natural resources facilitates the positive economic growth of any country.

According to development File Size: KB. Auty, R.M. () Resource Abundance and Economic Development. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

被如下文章引用: TITLE: Resource Rents and Dependence in Sub-Saharan African Countries Economies AUTHORS: Daniel Chibueze Onyejiuwa KEYWORDS: Resource Curse, Resource Dependence, Resource Rents, Exports, Economic Growth JOURNAL NAME: Open Access Library. Resource Abundance and Economic Development: Improving the Performance of Resource-Rich Countries Volume/Issue No.

/44 Publication Date Place of Cited by: conference will be published in a book, tentatively titled Resource Abundance and Economic Development, edited by Richard Auty. The authors gratefully acknowledge the helpful remarks of Richard Auty and other project participants.

The usual disclaimer Size: KB. Natural resource abundance, institutions, and economic development Christa N. Brunnschweiler (ETH Zurich / University of Zurich) ⁄ 23 May, Abstract Since Sachs and Warner’s (a) contribution, there has been a lively de-bate on the so-called natural resource curse.

This paper re-examines the efiects of natural resource abundance on. Extract. Economists recognize that resource abundance can accelerate economic development by increasing the rate of investment in resource-rich economies relative to the rate in resource-poor economies and also by expanding the capacity of the economy to import the capital goods needed to build the infrastructure of a high-income by: 4.

TY - BOOK. T1 - Resource abundance and economic development. AU - Auty, Richard M. PY - Y1 - M3 - Book. SN - BT - Resource abundance and economic development.Auty, R.

(a), “Resource Abundance and Economic Development”. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Auty, R.(b). “Why resource endowments can undermine economic development: Concepts and case studies”.

Paper prepared for the BP-Amoco Seminar, Lincoln College, and Oxford 28– 29 November. Baland, J.The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources.

There are many theories and much academic debate about the reasons for, and exceptions to.